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't they know about the fiscal cliff? >> they look to be down 10%. >> we'll watch it. as people know in this market, many times the stock price has been going up. we'll keep an eye on this. it may be throwing people. what does it say about copper overall and the price of the metal. >> i worry, by the way, watch energy 21. this is exxi. another company that bought old properties. one of the things that's happening that's driving this, okay, is that there's new technology. american technology that's able to access oil that the big guys have given up on whether it be exxon given up on energy 21 has or bp and it turns out that these fines may have been bigger so pxp takes advantage of the fact there's new technology. pxp is a deal maker but ready to trade because capital gains taxes are going up. could be a fiscal cliff. the gulf is hotter than it's ever been even a few years ago it was ice cold. >> big story in the journal about exploration in this country. production 15-year high. brand new chapter here. look at the bottom of your screen. citigroup is cutting 11,000 jobs. we want to ge
and that there really i don't believe is any effect from the supposed anxiety about the fiscal cliff. i think people know there will be some type of resolution. we didn't know the details or when. but companies are still investing the way they would normally do and they're not stopping because of -- >> that doesn't make us quake a bit about the jobs report later this will week and what that does for investors' nerves? >> we know it will be worse than it would have been because of super storm sandy. so you didn't know how much it was to do with that and how much was the economy. so it will be a bit of a wash in terms of reading the tea leaves for the u.s. >> so the growth picture for the u.s., we sort of 1%, 2%, depending on what happens with the fiscal cliff. what do you think, 2.5%? >> yeah, i think we should be 2.5% to 3% by the end of next year. >> which might be a slightly better outturn. china seems to be back on track. is there anything in europe -- what's the tail risk at the moment? >> i think there's two things that could still go wrong in europe. one, there's always political risk. in ital
over the fiscal cliff if republicans don't give in on higher taxes for the wealthy. a little bit of trade data out of the uk. i didn't have a forecast for this. adjusted global goods trade deficit 9.5 billion. september unrevised. forecast here forecast at 8.65, so that is a wide deficit than forecast. adjusted 4.5 billion. sterling not reacting huge amount. european stocks today are firmer. up 0.4% for the ftse. xetra dax continues its strong momentum, we are trading at 52 week highs and up now about 27% for the year. bond markets which is where we stand with yields, spanish ten year yields slightly lower, but we were 5.2% beginning of the week was the handle. currency markets, not huge changes. euro-dollar just below 1.31, dollar-yen 82.44. euro trading, though, at a fresh day high it must be said. we have comments coming out of china on the smartphone segment. apple's rang in china smartphone market which will become the world's biggest this year down to number six in the third quarter. facing tougher competition from chinese brands. this is the research firm idc coming out wi
of kabuke theater. >> everyone got disgusted. nobody needs that image. >> the fiscal cliff will certainly be one of the main topics of discussion when president obama meets with some of the nation's governors today. actually i think they're meeting with vice president biden. then governors will be meeting with some of the congressional leadership, as well. but you guys are watching this, we know this is drama and theater. do you think a deal gets struck at the end of the day? >> i do. i have to say, i still think we'll get a last minute deal. i just cannot imagine that congress will allow to us go over the cliff. so i think the ramifications for the economy are too significant. i think we're watching whatever you want to call it, all of the politics playing out, but i still think in the end we'll get a last minute deal. >> i agree. and i think even though the sides are far apart, you have things on the table now. so you can say you're here at 800, 1.6, you kind of -- it gets you somewhere close. somebody will try to say 1.3 versus 1.1, but if you see publicly what they're stating and hope
, ross. i mean, you don't really know what is going to come out of the u.s. fiscal cliff, how damaging potentially that can be to u.s. confidence, u.s. activity. things seem to be holding up fairly well in china. but i think there is still going to be some concerns about the whole performance of the asian economy and whether that can actually pick up next year. and then, of course, in the eurozone itself, we seem to be mending the problems progressively and taking out the tail risks, which i think is good and that is the bottom line that investors should take going further forward, but at the same time, there are some elements that you can have. if you do a forecast, in a way you could come up with something like 1% quotes for next year, but at the same time, you have to be conscious that we've had such a battery of downside impact, downside negative news coming through really for all economists in the western world in the last few years. you have to be very cognizant of those. >> i think so. julian, we're going to leave because we have to get a break in and we've got to g to egypt as
catching a lot of people by surprise. >> it's a fiscal cliff decline. this is the greatest capital gains generator of our lifetime. i would love to see what the gains are going to be next year. but i would be saying you need to sell it. we have no idea where the capital gains are going to go, we're going to go over the fiscal cliff, what do you have to lose, the rates are going to go up. i don't think it makes any difference two tim geithner says. >> it is so widely held by so many who want to play the stock market, let's say, beyond just the capital gains, whether it's in taxable account organization not and it also has the psychological impact that this is the one that i'm going to get out of because i'm afraid of what's coming in general? >> this is the stock, yes, it's cheap, now once it goes down, we have a million reasons, well, it's a nokia phone, well, it's china. ipad miniis available. this is a stock that's so widely owned. it reminds me of sirius satellite. every doctor, every dentist owns apple. they don't know the price per share, they just know it is the proxy for the marke
a moment. we do want to begin with the markets and that looming fiscal cliff. the dow finishing november lower for the second consecutive month. the blue chips falling half a percent in november. and #% sinnasdaq and s&p did fi higher last month. six out of ten sectors managed to post a gain. consumer discretionary stocks up the most. utilities the biggest losers. and while individual trading sessions may have been choppy, it was another month of low volatility. the vix remained below 20 for the fourth consecutive month and that's the longest streak since february of 2007. a big part of the market story has obviously been a big topic dominating the sunday talk shows. tim geithner arguing republicans need make the next move in negotiations. >> republicans have said that they don't like those reforms or they would like to do more. and if that's true, then they should tell us what they would like as an alternative. build on those, tell us how. but we can't react to anything until we see the details of the proposal and we need it on the rates and revenue side as well as on the spending side.
this morning begins in washington where fiscal cliff negotiations according to the "times" has "collapsed." at least for now. with less than a month until the deadline, who blinks first if anyone? >> goldman takes dell from a strength to a buy. is it time to look at the stock and maybe even other players in the beat up personal computer sector? >> manufacturing data out of china. not bad. 50.6. that's the highest in seven months. although shanghai again trades lower even europe's pmi improves a touch in november. first up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on board with you because they fear your view. they think you do not favor going -- you favor going over the
here are worried about the fiscal cliff and the potential impact that it could have on american consumers as well as the factories here. eunice yun, cnbc, beijing. >> are those fears right, is the the expansion just investment-led and therefore not worth as much and that seems to be the insinuation? >> also i think china and china manufacturing has always historically been investment led anyway. much less consumer dependent than what we see maybe in europe and the u.s. but, yes, that meeting is just back into expansion territory. that's good in itself. global growth will be looking for china to be going ahead. so good but modest. so any demand elsewhere could have an impact on china. >> have we had the china slowdown? >> we've had mosts of it i think. but again, china is very much in recent line with the cycle of the global economy and we'll be looking for some of the big growth engines to help them, as well. >> what's the chinese swing factor for investors? >> sitting in europe clearly it's something we focus upon. is it a driving force, absolutely not. the tail risk i think is
, everybody is saying it is a fiscal clove -- a fiscal slope, not a fiscal cliff. it is not like a zombie accomplice happens. if market confidence was up the window, that could be damaging. >> i think is likely there is going to be a deal, some other deadline for another deal next year. it is really important and they not said a whole series of opportunities to have that kind of collapse again. they have a couple months, but they have to make sure whenever they come up with for the last significant period of time. i think that will build confidence. i want to come back to the question of housing. i think is so important to overstate the importance of housing to the economy. especially from the starter business and start up perspective. those are the companies with a lot of job creation. they all grow very rapidly, sometimes growing into large companies. they are not starting up that high written all right now. a big chunk of that is confidence. folks often do not have financial resources. if there are looking at the value of their home and 401k, they are taking a risk. there are calculati
:00 eastern. john boehner makes remarks on the fiscal cliff. we will show you that when the happens. by now, a little bit more about the fiscal cliff. >> we turn our attention this morning about unemployment benefits and how insurance could back -- how insurance could be impacted. thank you for coming in. we want to start the discussion. when we're talking about unemployment insurance, what specific programs are we talking about here? >> unemployment insurance is the combination of federal and state programs. it usually lasts up to six weeks. it can be extended up to 93 weeks, depending on which they were in. it is this extension that we're really talking about as part of the fiscal cliff. >> that is what might be cut. that is what automatically expires. we know it cost $30 billion to continue additional unemployment benefits. of the deal i want to make, the benefits should continue. firm stand. we have seen in the past obama host: what specific benefits do guest: usually some kind of a cash benefit or they may help the search for a job. it is usually about $300 a week. it can vary from sta
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11